5 Great Examples of Successful Amazon Affiliate Websites

Price Match Tool (Mobile App)

Hello, since the price match feature found in coreblue was decommissioned a few months ago, I didn't realize how much we would miss it at our store. Allowing customers coming back in made me realize how much more effort one has to put in to compare pricing.
So I made an app to help out fellow employees on the floor, heres what it does for now as of version 1.0.2 :
- Allows for a UPC to be scanned or entered in manually
- Allows a best buy sku to be used to search
- Shows pricing and gives a direct link to the product page
- Supports Bestbuy(of course), Walmart, Amazon(Partially), more to come as I get approved direct access to other retailers private API's. For example Target, Lowe's, Home Depot, Staples, and Wegmans I have applied for and awaiting confirmation to use their API.
I do want to look at another alternative for other retailers that I could not find if they have an api or api access to limited parties with a python web scraping bot, cool project ahead for me.
Feel free to leave feedback here or from my developer contact on the play/app store!
Link to Android: Android
Link to iOS: iPhone or iPad
Sidenote, as far as amazon's support goes I have their product advertising api integrated but currently it is not returning information as my account has too little activity to provide requests. I do need to have three sales referred from my Affiliate link within a 60 day period to be granted entry. I have a link in the pending update to amazons home page, if you would like to help me out reaching my goal please pm me and I will send you the link(as I can not post it here), otherwise I will get family to make some purchases through my link. Once the goal is reached, amazon pricing will be returned in the app, an updated may need to be published for it to be working correctly as I have not been able to work with the payloads yet.

Updated to add the apple link!
submitted by 87thesid to Bestbuy [link] [comments]

Covid-19 update Monday 27th April

Good afternoon from the UK. It’s Monday 27th April.

It was an up and down weekend in the Fwoggie2 household. I went and did a major grocery shop at a Tesco Extra supermarket near me (Tesco = major supermarket chain in the UK) on Friday night. The store has a one way system to navigate round the store and you’re supposed to keep 2m away from anyone else. This is almost impossible I found as I constantly had to back the hell up as people barged in to grab what they wanted and to hell with any one way system. The older they were it seemed (I’m in my 40’s), the less they cared about social distancing. It took me 2.5 hours to finally complete the shop (I had to go back for a few more things on the Saturday morning).
As for Sunday, my wife was well enough to join me and the dog on a hour long walk (we never got within 10 metres of anyone else because we have lots of open countryside outside our front door so social distancing on walks is very easy to do) and the allotment got a major update; it now has 20 more white onions, over 50 red onion seeds, about 60 parsnips (which are notoriously hard to germinate especially in heavy soil like ours but it's worth a try), 7 rosemary plants and about 50 radishes. By the end of this week I hope to plant 75 carrots, 60 spring onions, 45 beetroot. The more we can grow the better; squash, courgettes/zucchini are on the agenda soon too with sweetcorn and brassicas a week or two further down the line.
Life though can twist and turn in an instant; #RIPMark has been trending on UK Twitter todayas Covid-19 takes another victim here in the UK with the death count now well over 21k (if you believe the government stats) or over 41k (if you want to believe the Financial Times instead). To see an example of the British Covid-19 story in three brief tweets, click here. Failing that, please continue to stay at home if at all possible.

Virus news







Supply chain news in depth


While passenger flights stay on ground freight rates are flying high - Stat Times reports that while passengers are going nowhere, there’s considerable demand for airfreight. Airfreight is the most expensive mode of transporting goods, but also the fastest, reliable and secure style of moving it. Roughly, airlines handle just one percent of all the global trade volumes but at the same time enjoy 35 percent of its value. In that sense, the pre-Covid-19 world was pretty sure about what sort of goods must move in the ocean and what in the air. But in the world hit by Covid-19 pandemic, air cargo has moved from the premium mode to the super-premium with freight rates climbing new heights each day it says. Demand for airfreight capacity from the West to China is limited, but large quantities of PPE are coming out of China resulting in rapidly growing rates.
(Cont’d) According to TAC Index, on April 13, 2020, the airlines reportedly charged a new record price of $9.64 per kg to move cargo from Shanghai to Frankfurt compared to $2.46 on March 9, a jump of 291 percent in just one month. Meanwhile, on the Frankfurt-Shanghai route, it fell around normal rates of $1.17per kg as of April 13 compared to $2.78 on February 17, when the rates were at its peak. The average air freight rate to transport goods from Shanghai to Europe is around $8.65 per kg, while from Frankfurt to China is $1.41. The same for Hong Kong to Europe is $4.66 compared to $5.11 on April 6 and $2.58 on March 9. The falling rates from Hong Kong are reportedly due to the new regulations introduced by the Chinese government in April to clamp down the low-quality Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) exported from the country. The government made it mandatory for PPEs to have customs clearance which pushed the companies to ship them from mainland airports instead of trans-shipping through Hong Kong.
(Cont’d) Airfreight rates on Shanghai-Dallas/Fort Worth route rose to $8.72 per kg on April 13 compared to $4.91 on March 9, while Hong Kong-Dallas is at $4.88 compared to $5.79 on April 6 and $3.53 on March 9. On average, air cargo from Shanghai to the US is now available at $6.92 compared to $3.36 on March 9, an increase of 105 percent in one month. Meanwhile the same from Hong Kong is available at $5.55 per kg compared to $3.35 on March 9. Rates from London to the US stood at $4.04 per kg compared to $1.12 on March 9, an increase of 260 percent, while Frankfurt to the US reported $4.12 compared to $5.31 on March 30, when it witnessed a steady increase of 223 percent, from $1.64 on March 9. While on the other side, from Chicago to European destinations, rates reported an increase of 173 percent. From $0.96 on March 9, it went up to $2.63 per kg on April 13.
(Con’td) It’s not all good news however, with some people priced out of airfreight moving to rail - and liking it. In the meantime, a large section of cargo that used to travel in the air is moving to more predictable rail route between Europe and China. Stakeholders of air cargo fear that a significant amount of cargo will move to rail, permanently. On April 3, 2020, the freight forwarding company, Davies Turner announced that its weekly rail import service from China to the UK has broken previous records in transit times amid demand spike. Philip Stephenson, chairman, Davies Turner said “The impact of Covid-19 will push many shippers to rethink their supply chains, and that could see a lot more Asia-Europe air and ocean freight traffic moving permanently to the rail.”

Coronavirus chokes the drug trade from Wuhan, through Mexico and onto U.S. streets - The LA Times explains Wuhan is known for its production of chemicals, including the ingredients needed to cook fentanyl and other powerful synthetic opioids. Vendors there shipped huge quantities around the world. The biggest customers were Mexican drug cartels, which have embraced fentanyl in recent years because it is cheaper and easier to produce than heroin. But the novel coronavirus that emerged in Wuhan late last year before spreading across the planet has disrupted the fentanyl supply chain, causing a ripple effect that has cut into the profits of Mexican traffickers and driven up street drug prices across the United States. The narcotics trade, which relies on the constant movement of goods and people, has been stymied by lockdowns, travel bans and other efforts to contain the virus, according to government officials, academic researchers and drug traffickers.
(Cont’d) Logan Pauley, a researcher at C4ADS, a Washington-based think tank focused on transnational security, noticed a decrease in advertisements for fentanyl precursors. He said vendors switched to selling other products, including face masks and anti-malarial drugs that some doctors and politicians initially hoped would help treat the coronavirus. The drop in exports has left some Mexican drug producers with less access to needed chemicals. Simultaneously, cartels have encountered another colossal challenge: new restrictions on entry to the United States — the world’s biggest market for illegal drugs. Kameron Korte, a spokeswoman for the San Diego field division of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency, said fentanyl pills in her region now sell for $7 each, up from $5 a few months ago. The average cost of methamphetamine has risen from $1,000 per pound to $1,400 per pound, she said. Similar price hikes have been seen in other parts of the country. Drug users have grumbled about rising prices on online forums. On a message board on the website Reddit, one person complained that prices of fentanyl pills in Phoenix had nearly doubled. “Border shut = less trafficking,” it said.

Supply chain news in brief













Donations


Several asked if they can send me $/£/€ via Patreon (in some cases because I've saved them time or money, others for no reason at all). I don't need the cash (that's lovely though) but as you may have read above, food bank charities are getting really hit hard with all this panic buying. Please consider giving whatever you'd have given me to a foodbank charity instead:
UK: https://www.trusselltrust.org/
France: https://www.banquealimentaire.org/
Germany: https://www.tafel.de/
Netherlands: https://www.voedselbankennederland.nl/steun-ons/steun-voedselbank-donatie/
Italy: https://www.bancoalimentare.it/it/node/1
Spain: https://www.fesbal.org/
Australia: https://www.foodbank.org.au/
Canada: https://www.foodbankscanada.ca/
USA: https://www.feedingamerica.org/
Thanks in advance for any donations you give. If there's foodbank charities in your country and it's not listed above, please suggest it and I will include it going forward.
submitted by Fwoggie2 to supplychain [link] [comments]

CASE STUDY: Transitioning my niche site to ecommerce using Shopify

Disclaimer: My site is very small and I don't purport this to be a gamechanger for, well, anyone. I just wanted to share something that is seeming to work well for me.
I started my niche site in 2018 -- it is focused around a particular type of vehicle that has a hobbyist following. Initially the site was monetized through a combination of Google Adsense and the Amazon Associates program. At some point, I started trying to diversify the income as much as possible. For me, this meant adding the eBay Partner Network for some items and applying for Ezoic as soon as I met the requirements.
I also experimented with some small affiliate programs but didn't have much success -- I had to get very creative to find them as most of the stores I really wanted to refer sales for did not offer an affiliate program. I reached out to them multiple times seeing if there was something we could arrange. I even offered to just sell display ads to them, but no dice. The result was signing up for a couple small affiliate programs with low commissions and low sales volume proructs. This frustration was the start of my desire to curate my own store of products I genuinely want to sell.

Shopify and subdomaining
I use Shopify to host my online store. I am a software engineer by profession so I generally don't consider ease-of-use and setup to be the most important factors when choosing software -- I just want whatever is the most effective. There are other options like WooCommerce that I have heard great things about.
However, for me, Shopify is almost magically easy to use and offers everything I have needed or wanted so far. Following Warren Buffet's advice to "buy what you like" I actually bought as much stock in the company as I could after using it for a month. Everything just works exactly how I expect it to. I have never struggled to find any answers or documentation about anything. The support is phenomenal.
It's just a great product -- to me I think they could be a bigger company then Amazon in a few years because it allows anyone to create to sell online and maintain a lot of control, something retailers lose with Amazon. I signed up for the Shopify affiliate program because I want to refer people to it, not to refer people to it. I helped my cousin set one up for his beef jerky business and it took 20 minutes before he was online and it has been a gamechanger. The small independent grocery store across the street from me is surviving (probably thriving) through COVID-19 because they allow online orders through Shopify and window pickup. But most importantly, it's great to get the little notification when you make a sale, especially when the margins are so much higher than affiliate, but I'll get to that later.
For me, I used a shop.mydomain.com subdomain for my Shopify site. It's great because there are no conflicts with your Wordpress site and it's a very clean looking link. Shopify has some documentation on this if you would like to try it.

Profit Margins
Selling items yourself is great mainly because you get to choose and experiment with your profit margins. Want to experiment with razor-thin margins because you know your visitors will shop around a lot? Try it. Want to raise the price so any one sale is $80 in profit but you don't have to pack and ship as much? Might work, try it! Between Google Analytics and Shopify's analytics stats, you can measure anything you need to.
Here's a concrete example of one item from my site. I sell a particular type of spark plug that is used on a vehicle that my site is partly focused on. This is an item I have sold/referred in one way or another since the beginning of my site in 2018:
This is a small item that is extremely easy to buy in bulk and pack/ship quickly.
I actually averaged more clicks to this item when the destination was Amazon, so my conversion rate actually went up when I moved away from Amazon. I charge a few dollars more than Amazon and many other online retailers for this item. I could probably do some experimenting to find the optimal price/sales ratio, but I think those numbers speak for themselves.
One of my early fears was that the trust people have for Amazon and their affinity towards Prime is hard to challenge, but my opinion is that the trust you gain by writing well-researched, meaningful articles and being an active participant in the niche you serve makes people want to support you.

Dropshipping
Dropshipping has negative connotations because of the bastardized "buy cheap small items from overseas and make 4000% profit while the user doesn't know that the item wont arrive for 2 months" format that is shown by YouTube influencers and the like. However, dropshipping is simply collecting a sale yourself while having an underlying price agreement with a supplier who will pack and ship the item for you. The first item I sold through my Shopify store I actually sold on a dropshipping basis.
This was a line of products within the $200-300 price range, and I also sold these through the Amazon Associates program before. It was nice to make $10-17 for one sale, but I felt like I should be making more. I called the company that produces this item and asked to buy 3 or 4 to sell myself, but he suggested dropshipping instead which I was interested in as these items are rather large. I agreed to buy the items for around $160-200 and now I profit around $60 per sale -- the only effort required on my end is sending an email (gave them a card to have on file) and adding the tracking number to Shopify when it is available. The credit card points are nice too!
One other thing about this that I think is important -- It's really nice to have personal relationships that this kind of business offers. The guy that answered the phone was the owner of the small business and he's the nicest guy, great to deal with and it feels good to get him some sales, especially during a crisis like this. I actually met up with him at an industry event and we talked for a long time. He's an older guy and at some point I want to get him setup with a better online presence especially as he sells a lot of other products over the phone that I can't necessarily refer in my niche, but could definitely benefit from a real online store and web presence. I am building similar relationships with other suppliers and personally I love it.

Item Selection
If you go the route of stocking and shipping items yourself, the scope of products you can monetize through your site broadens drastically. For me, there was always a certain type of item that I wanted to sell, but I could never find a good version of this item on Amazon or anywhere that offered an affiliate program. This was actually one of the retailers I reached out to asking for an affiliate program to no avail. Then I asked for a dropshipping agreement -- the answer was still no. However, it's a lot easier when you ask to buy 50x of one item. They processed my distributor account in a day and had my items to me by the end of the week. It is now my best selling item!

Shipping Logistics and Tools
One of the things that I think could be a dealbreaker for people is something I personally really enjoy -- stocking, packing, and shipping items. My inventory is small enough to fit in a walk-in closet in my apartment. I love the process of getting the Shopfiy "ca-ching" notification, packing the order, and dropping it off at the mailbox. Here are some tools I have used to make this process more efficient:
Here is part of my dedicated "ship-station" where I manage my store and print labels/packing slips.
https://i.imgur.com/TdRfvEK.jpg
I would probably wait to receive the items you're selling before selecting the packaging you're going to use. That way you can take exact measurements and consider alternative sizes/types of packages. One of my items is a collection of smaller items. I throw away the box that my supplier ships it in, and put it in a bag that goes inside my small mailer box. I use a particular size of bubble wrap which was also specifically chosen to protect the item, while also taking up all of the surrounding space. It's much easier to make all of these choices when you have the item in front of you.
Here's the previously mentioned item (spark plugs) in the box I chose (bubble wrap not shown!) There is no wasted space when it is packed.
https://i.imgur.com/IXgTxm0.jpg
For me, I use USPS for nearly all of my orders. It's usually the cheapest option and very fast for the size of item I have. I live in an apartment complex and I can just drop my packages in the mailroom and they get picked up daily. Shopify will show you all of the available shipping options with speed and price. For international orders, it's only a few dollars more, and I think it goes from USPS and gets picked up by DHL.

Item Presentation
Another benefit of this approach is that you have infinitely more opportunity to make a good impression on your customers which is huge if your items are the kind that might be reordered, or if the customer may be interested in other items you sell. For me, item presentation is also important because as I said, I am operating out of a spare closet in my apartment, so I want to look as professional as possible.
Here are some ways you can do this:

Advertising
I have not yet started experimenting with any form of ads. All of my sales thus far have been the result of organic traffic from the content on my website funneled through to my store. This month I am going to experiment with Facebook and Google Ads. Obviously this may not work but if there is a decent enough margin after the increased customer acquisition cost I will continue. I will report these results later!

Legality and Relationship to Affiliate Marketing
Keeping in mind that we in this business typically operate as affiliates, the golden rule is to make sure you are recommending the absolute best products to your site visitors. Thinking back to the Casper mattress affiliate drama, there should be research and thought behind your recommendations. Selling the items yourself does complicate this. I have used all of the items I sell on my store. When I moved my links over from Amazon, I kept the notes indicating that I have used the item, but I also added a link to an explanation of my store.
I think it ends up being an extra vote of confidence when I explain to users: I have tried the items I sell and think they are the best in their category. I used to sell these items as an affiliate and would receive a commission, but I believe in them strongly enough that I now stock and sell them myself. I am not the only one who sells them and you can certainly buy from others if you find a better price/shipping speed.
I'll restate what I said before because I think it is extremely illuminating: My conversion rates went up when I moved items from Amazon to my own store!
The bottom line is that you need to be explicit about these things to be safe and honest. I think my niche works particularly well for this as people are looking for a.) What exact version of the item do I need? and b.) How do I use it? I know many niche sites are focused around "Top 10 X" type content and this may become a lot more difficult within the honesty/legality context. Something to think about.
As a final note, I still operate this as a sole proprietorship. Eventually I want to get an LLC for it. I have been upfront about this with all of my suppliers and none of them have required this for a distributor agreement.

My Stats
Here are my income sources over time. I apologize for the colors used in the line charts of individual sources, I could not figure out how to configure those.
https://i.imgur.com/bkeK6PJ.jpg
https://i.imgur.com/8ES9cG5.jpg
As you can see, my site is very small. However, the relationship between the decline these past few months in display advertising revenue (Ezoic literally sent an email saying to expect lower rates) and the Amazon Associates rate cut charted against my growing Shopify revenue really opened my eyes to the benefit I gained from diversifying towards ecommerce/Shopify. I still keep the older sources of revenue, but I actually think I will consider eliminating them in the future, especially display ads. Diversification is necessary when the revenue source lacks control -- Amazon Associates can slash rates willy-nilly, eBay Partner Network can apparently just decide to not pay me for a large sale I made, who even knows what these display ad networks are actually getting paid for our clicks or if every click is considered, etc.
Selling the items yourself gives you a lot more responsibility, but a lot more control. One of the primary reasons I'm so excited about this is that my inventory is still VERY small. I am working to add new items and it's wonderful because even if I only sell a few, the profit margins make it so much easier to spend the time to create the content and stock/ship the item -- a luxury I never had with Amazon.
Please feel free to ask any questions! I'd love to help if I can.
submitted by Mark-JST to juststart [link] [comments]

/r/Scams Common Scam Master Post

Hello visitors and subscribers of scams! Here you will find a master list of common (and uncommon) scams that you may encounter online or in real life. Thank you to the many contributors who helped create this thread!

If you know of a scam that is not covered here, write a comment and it will be added to the next edition.

Previous threads: https://old.reddit.com/Scams/search?q=common+scams+master+post&restrict_sr=on
Blackmail email scam thread: https://old.reddit.com/Scams/comments/g8jqnthe_blackmail_email_scam_part_5//
Some of these articles are from small, local publications and refer to the scam happening in a specific area. Do not think that this means that the scam won't happen in your area.

Spoofing

Caller ID spoofing
It is very easy for anyone to make a phone call while having any number show up on the caller ID of the person receiving the phone call. Receiving a phone call from a certain number does not mean that the person/company who owns that number has actually called you.
Email spoofing
The "from" field of an email can be set by the sender, meaning that you can receive scam emails that look like they are from legitimate addresses. It's important to never click links in emails unless absolutely necessary, for example a password reset link you requested or an account activation link for an account you created.
SMS spoofing
SMS messages can be spoofed, so be wary of messages that seem to be from your friends or other trusted people.

The most common scams

The fake check scam (Credit to nimble2 for this part)
The fake check scam arises from many different situations (for instance, you applied for a job, or you are selling something on a place like Craigslist, or someone wants to purchase goods or services from your business, or you were offered a job as a mystery shopper, you were asked to wrap your car with an advertisement, or you received a check in the mail for no reason), but the bottom line is always something like this:
General fraudulent funds scams If somebody is asking you to accept and send out money as a favour or as part of a job, it is a fraudulent funds scam. It does not matter how they pay you, any payment on any service can be fraudulent and will be reversed when it is discovered to be fraudulent.
Phone verification code scams Someone will ask you to receive a verification text and then tell you to give them the code. Usually the code will come from Google Voice, or from Craigslist. In the Google version of the scam, your phone number will be used to verify a Google Voice account that the scammer will use to scam people with. In the Craigslist version of the scam, your phone number will be used to verify a Craigslist posting that the scammer will use to scam people. There is also an account takeover version of this scam that will involve the scammer sending a password reset token to your phone number and asking you for it.
Bitcoin job scams
Bitcoin job scams involve some sort of fraudulent funds transfer, usually a fake check although a fraudulent bank transfer can be used as well. The scammer will send you the fraudulent money and ask you to purchase bitcoins. This is a scam, and you will have zero recourse after you send the scammer bitcoins.
Email flooding
If you suddenly receive hundreds or thousands of spam emails, usually subscription confirmations, it's very likely that one of your online accounts has been taken over and is being used fraudulently. You should check any of your accounts that has a credit card linked to it, preferably from a computer other than the one you normally use. You should change all of your passwords to unique passwords and you should start using two factor authentication everywhere.
Boss/CEO scam A scammer will impersonate your boss or someone who works at your company and will ask you to run an errand for them, which will usually be purchasing gift cards and sending them the code. Once the scammer has the code, you have no recourse.
Employment certification scams
You will receive a job offer that is dependent on you completing a course or receiving a certification from a company the scammer tells you about. The scammer operates both websites and the job does not exist.
Craigslist fake payment scams
Scammers will ask you about your item that you have listed for sale on a site like Craigslist, and will ask to pay you via Paypal. They are scamming you, and the payment in most cases does not actually exist, the email you received was sent by the scammers. In cases where you have received a payment, the scammer can dispute the payment or the payment may be entirely fraudulent. The scammer will then either try to get you to send money to them using the fake funds that they did not send to you, or will ask you to ship the item, usually to a re-shipping facility or a parcel mule.
General fraudulent funds scams The fake check scam is not the only scam that involves accepting fraudulent/fake funds and purchasing items for scammers. If your job or opportunity involves accepting money and then using that money, it is almost certainly a frauduent funds scam. Even if the payment is through a bank transfer, Paypal, Venmo, Zelle, Interac e-Transfer, etc, it does not matter.
Credit card debt scam
Fraudsters will offer to pay off your bills, and will do so with fraudulent funds. Sometimes it will be your credit card bill, but it can be any bill that can be paid online. Once they pay it off, they will ask you to send them money or purchase items for them. The fraudulent transaction will be reversed in the future and you will never be able to keep the money. This scam happens on sites like Craigslist, Twitter, Instagram, and also some dating sites, including SeekingArrangement.
The parcel mule scam
A scammer will contact you with a job opportunity that involves accepting and reshipping packages. The packages are either stolen or fraudulently obtained items, and you will not be paid by the scammer. Here is a news article about a scam victim who fell for this scam and reshipped over 20 packages containing fraudulently acquired goods.
The Skype sex scam
You're on Facebook and you get a friend request from a cute girl you've never met. She wants to start sexting and trading nudes. She'll ask you to send pictures or videos or get on webcam where she can see you naked with your face in the picture. The scam: There's no girl. You've sent nudes to a guy pretending to be a girl. As soon as he has the pictures he'll demand money and threaten to send the pictures to your friends and family. Sometimes the scammer will upload the video to a porn site or Youtube to show that they are serious.
What to do if you are a victim of this scam: You cannot buy silence, you can only rent it. Paying the blackmailer will show them that the information they have is valuable and they will come after you for more money. Let your friends and family know that you were scammed and tell them to ignore friend requests or messages from people they don't know. Also, make sure your privacy settings are locked down and consider deactivating your account.
The underage girl scam
You're on a dating site or app and you get contacted by a cute girl. She wants to start sexting and trading nudes. Eventually she stops communicating and you get a call from a pissed off guy claiming to be the girl's father, or a police officer, or a private investigator, or something else along those lines. Turns out the girl you were sexting is underage, and her parents want some money for various reasons, such as to pay for a new phone, to pay for therapy, etc. There is, of course, no girl. You were communicating with a scammer.
What to do if you are a victim of this scam: Stop picking up the phone when the scammers call. Do not pay them, or they will be after you for more money.
Phishing
Phishing is when a scammer tries to trick you into giving information to them, such as your password or private financial information. Phishing messages will usually look very similar to official messages, and sometimes they are identical. If you are ever required to login to a different account in order to use a service, you should be incredibly cautious.
The blackmail email scam The exact wording of the emails varies, but there are generally four main parts. They claim to have placed software/malware on a porn/adult video site, they claim to have a video of you masturbating or watching porn, they threaten to release the video to your friends/family/loved ones/boss/dog, and they demand that you pay them in order for them to delete the video. Rest assured that this is a very common spam campaign and there is no truth behind the email or the threats. Here are some news articles about this scam.
The blackmail mail scam
This is very similar to the blackmail email scam, but you will receive a letter in the mail.
Rental scams Usually on local sites like Craigslist, scammers will steal photos from legitimate real estate listings and will list them for rent at or below market rate. They will generally be hesitant to tell you the address of the property for "safety reasons" and you will not be able to see the unit. They will then ask you to pay them a deposit and they claim they will ship you the keys. In reality, your money is gone and you will have no recourse.
Craigslist vehicle scams A scammer will list a vehicle on Craigslist and will offer to ship you the car. In many cases they will also falsely claim to sell you the car through eBay or Amazon. If you are looking for a car on Craigslist and the seller says anything about shipping the car, having an agent, gives you a long story about why they are selling the car, or the listing price is far too low, you are talking to a scammer and you should ignore and move on.
Advance-fee scam, also known as the 419 scam, or the Nigerian prince scam. You will receive a communication from someone who claims that you are entitled to a large sum of money, or you can help them obtain a large sum of money. However, they will need money from you before you receive the large sum.
Man in the middle scams
Man in the middle scams are very common and very hard to detect. The scammer will impersonate a company or person you are legitimately doing business with, and they will ask you to send the money to one of their own bank accounts or one controlled by a money mule. They have gained access to the legitimate persons email address, so there will be nothing suspicious about the email. To prevent this, make contact in a different way that lets you verify that the person you are talking to is the person you think you are talking to.
Cam girl voting/viewer scam
You will encounter a "cam girl" on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask you to go to their site and sign up with your credit card. They may offer a free show, or ask you to vote for them, or any number of other fake stories.
Amateur porn recruitment scam
You will encounter a "pornstar" on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask you to create an adult film with hehim, but first you need to do something. The story here is usually something to do with verifying your age, or you needing to take an STD test that involves sending money to a site operated by the scammer.
Hot girl SMS spam
You receive a text from a random number with a message along the lines of "Hey babe I'm here in town again if you wanted to meet up this time, are you around?" accompanied by a NSFW picture of a hot girl. It's spam, and they'll direct you to their scam website that requires a credit card.
Identity verification scam
You will encounter someone on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask that you verify your identity as they are worried about catfishing. The scammer operates the site, and you are not talking to whoever you think you are talking to.
This type of scam teases you with something, then tries to make you sign up for something else that costs money. The company involved is often innocent, but they turn a blind eye to the practice as it helps their bottom line, even if they have to occasionally issue refunds. A common variation takes place on dating sites/dating apps, where you will match with someone who claims to be a camgirl who wants you to sign up for a site and vote for her. Another variation takes place on local sites like Craigslist, where the scammers setup fake rental scams and demand that you go through a specific service for a credit check. Once you go through with it, the scammer will stop talking to you. Another variation also takes place on local sites like Craigslist, where scammers will contact you while you are selling a car and will ask you to purchase a Carfax-like report from a specific website.
Multi Level Marketing or Affiliate Marketing
You apply for a vague job listing for 'sales' on craigslist. Or maybe an old friend from high school adds you on Facebook and says they have an amazing business opportunity for you. Or maybe the well dressed guy who's always interviewing people in the Starbucks that you work at asks if you really want to be slinging coffee the rest of your life. The scam: MLMs are little more than pyramid schemes. They involve buying some sort of product (usually snake oil health products like body wraps or supplements) and shilling them to your friends and family. They claim that the really money is recruiting people underneath you who give you a slice of whatever they sell. And if those people underneath you recruit more people, you get a piece of their sales. Ideally if you big enough pyramid underneath you the money will roll in without any work on your part. Failure to see any profit will be your fault for not "wanting it enough." The companies will claim that you need to buy their extra training modules or webinars to really start selling. But in reality, the vast majority of people who buy into a MLM won't see a cent. At the end of the day all you'll be doing is annoying your friends and family with your constant recruitment efforts. What to look out for: Recruiters love to be vague. They won't tell you the name of the company or what exactly the job will entail. They'll pump you up with promises of "self-generating income", "being your own boss", and "owning your own company." They might ask you to read books about success and entrepreneurs. They're hoping you buy into the dream first. If you get approached via social media, check their timelines. MLMs will often instruct their victims to pretend that they've already made it. They'll constantly post about how they're hustling and making the big bucks and linking to youtube videos about success. Again, all very vague about what their job actually entails. If you think you're being recruited: Ask them what exactly the job is. If they can't answer its probably a MLM. Just walk away.

Phone scams

You should generally avoid answering or engaging with random phone calls. Picking up and engaging with a scam call tells the scammers that your phone number is active, and will usually lead to more calls.
Tax Call
You get a call from somebody claiming to be from your countries tax agency. They say you have unpaid taxes that need to be paid immediately, and you may be arrested or have other legal action taken against you if it is not paid. This scam has caused the American IRS, Canadian CRA, British HMRC, and Australian Tax Office to issue warnings. This scam happens in a wide variety of countries all over the world.
Warrant Call
Very similar to the tax call. You'll get a phone call from an "agent", "officer", "sheriff", or other law enforcement officer claiming that there is a warrant out for your arrest and you will be arrested very soon. They will then offer to settle everything for a fee, usually paid in giftcards.
[Legal Documents/Process Server Calls]
Very similar to the warrant call. You'll get a phone call from a scammer claiming that they are going to serve you legal documents, and they will threaten you with legal consequences if you refuse to comply. They may call themselves "investigators", and will sometimes give you a fake case number.
Student Loan Forgiveness Scam
Scammers will call you and tell you about a student loan forgiveness program, but they are interested in obtaining private information about you or demanding money in order to join the fake program.
Tech Support Call You receive a call from someone with a heavy accent claiming to be a technician Microsoft or your ISP. They inform you that your PC has a virus and your online banking and other accounts may be compromised if the virus is not removed. They'll have you type in commands and view diagnostics on your PC which shows proof of the virus. Then they'll have you install remote support software so the technician can work on your PC, remove the virus, and install security software. The cost of the labor and software can be hundreds of dollars. The scam: There's no virus. The technician isn't a technician and does not work for Microsoft or your ISP. Scammers (primarily out of India) use autodialers to cold-call everyone in the US. Any file they point out to you or command they have you run is completely benign. The software they sell you is either freeware or ineffective. What to do you if you're involved with this scam: If the scammers are remotely on your computer as you read this, turn off your PC or laptop via the power button immediately, and then if possible unplug your internet connection. Some of the more vindictive tech scammers have been known to create boot passwords on your computer if they think you've become wise to them and aren't going to pay up. Hang up on the scammers, block the number, and ignore any threats about payment. Performing a system restore on your PC is usually all that is required to remove the scammer's common remote access software. Reports of identity theft from fake tech calls are uncommon, but it would still be a good idea to change your passwords for online banking and monitor your accounts for any possible fraud. How to avoid: Ignore any calls claiming that your PC has a virus. Microsoft will never contact you. If you're unsure if a call claiming to be from your ISP is legit, hang up, and then dial the customer support number listed on a recent bill. If you have elderly relatives or family that isn't tech savvy, take the time to fill them in on this scam.
Chinese government scam
This scam is aimed at Chinese people living in Europe and North America, and involves a voicemail from someone claiming to be associated with the Chinese government, usually through the Chinese consulate/embassy, who is threatening legal action or making general threats.
Chinese shipping scam
This scam is similar to the Chinese government scam, but involves a seized/suspicious package, and the scammers will connect the victim to other scammers posing as Chinese government investigators.
Social security suspension scam
You will receive a call from someone claiming to work for the government regarding suspicious activity, fraud, or serious crimes connected to your social security number. You'll be asked to speak to an operator and the operator will explain the steps you need to follow in order to fix the problems. It's all a scam, and will lead to you losing money and could lead to identity theft if you give them private financial information.
Utilities cutoff
You get a call from someone who claims that they are from your utility company, and they claim that your utilities will be shut off unless you immediately pay. The scammer will usually ask for payment via gift cards, although they may ask for payment in other ways, such as Western Union or bitcoin.
Relative in custody Scammer claims to be the police, and they have your son/daughtenephew/estranged twin in custody. You need to post bail (for some reason in iTunes gift cards or MoneyGram) immediately or the consequences will never be the same.
Mexican family scam
This scam comes in many different flavours, but always involves someone in your family and Mexico. Sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member has been detained, sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member has been kidnapped, and sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member is injured and needs help.
General family scams
Scammers will gather a large amount of information about you and target your family members using different stories with the goal of gettimg them to send money.
One ring scam
Scammers will call you from an international number with the goal of getting you to return their call, causing you to incur expensive calling fees.

Online shopping scams

THE GOLDEN RULE OF ONLINE SHOPPING: If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.
Dropshipping
An ad on reddit or social media sites like Facebook and Instagram offers items at huge discounts or even free (sometimes requiring you to reblog or like their page). They just ask you to pay shipping. The scam: The item will turn out to be very low quality and will take weeks or even months to arrive. Sometimes the item never arrives, and the store disappears or stops responding. The seller drop-ships the item from China. The item may only cost a few dollars, and the Chinese government actually pays for the shipping. You end up paying $10-$15 dollars for a $4 item, with the scammer keeping the profit. If you find one of these scams but really have your heart set on the item, you can find it on AliExpress or another Chinese retailer.
Influencer scams
A user will reach out to you on a social media platform, usually Instagram, and offer you the chance to partner with them and receive a free/discounted product, as long as you pay shipping. This is a different version of the dropshipping scam, and is just a marketing technique to get you to buy their products.
Triangulation fraud
Triangulation fraud occurs when you make a purchase on a site like Amazon or eBay for an item at a lower than market price, and receive an item that was clearly purchased new at full price. The scammer uses a stolen credit card to order your item, while the money from the listing is almost all profit for the scammer.
Instagram influencer scams
Someone will message you on Instagram asking you to promote their products, and offering you a discount code. The items are Chinese junk, and the offer is made to many people at a time.
Cheap Items
Many websites pop up and offer expensive products, including electronics, clothes, watches, sunglasses, and shoes at very low prices. The scam: Some sites are selling cheap knock-offs. Some will just take your money and run. What to do if you think you're involved with this scam: Contact your bank or credit card and dispute the charge. How to avoid: The sites often have every brand-name shoe or fashion item (Air Jordan, Yeezy, Gucci, etc) in stock and often at a discounted price. The site will claim to be an outlet for a major brand or even a specific line or item. The site will have images at the bottom claiming to be Secured by Norton or various official payment processors but not actual links. The site will have poor grammar and a mish-mash of categories. Recently, established websites will get hacked or their domain name jacked and turned into scam stores, meaning the domain name of the store will be completely unrelated to the items they're selling. If the deal sounds too good to be true it probably is. Nobody is offering brand new iPhones or Beats or Nintendo Switches for 75% off.
Cheap Amazon 3rd Party Items
You're on Amazon or maybe just Googling for an item and you see it for an unbelievable price from a third-party seller. You know Amazon has your back so you order it. The scam: One of three things usually happen: 1) The seller marks the items as shipped and sends a fake tracking number. Amazon releases the funds to the seller, and the seller disappears. Amazon ultimately refunds your money. 2) The seller immediately cancels the order and instructs you to re-order the item directly from their website, usually with the guarantee that the order is still protected by Amazon. The seller takes your money and runs. Amazon informs you that they do not offer protection on items sold outside of Amazon and cannot help you. 2) The seller immediately cancels the order and instructs you to instead send payment via an unused Amazon gift card by sending the code on the back via email. Once the seller uses the code, the money on the card is gone and cannot be refunded. How to avoid: These scammers can be identified by looking at their Amazon storefronts. They'll be brand new sellers offering a wide range of items at unbelievable prices. Usually their Amazon names will be gibberish, or a variation on FIRSTNAME.LASTNAME. Occasionally however, established storefronts will be hacked. If the deal is too good to be true its most likely a scam.
Scams on eBay
There are scams on eBay targeting both buyers and sellers. As a seller, you should look out for people who privately message you regarding the order, especially if they ask you to ship to a different address or ask to negotiate via text/email/a messaging service. As a buyer you should look out for new accounts selling in-demand items, established accounts selling in-demand items that they have no previous connection to (you can check their feedback history for a general idea of what they bought/sold in the past), and lookout for people who ask you to go off eBay and use another service to complete the transaction. In many cases you will receive a fake tracking number and your money will be help up for up to a month.
Scams on Amazon
There are scams on Amazon targeting both buyers and sellers. As a seller, you should look out for people who message you about a listing. As a buyer you should look out for listings that have an email address for you to contact the person to complete the transaction, and you should look out for cheap listings of in-demand items.
Scams on Reddit
Reddit accounts are frequently purchased and sold by fraudsters who wish to use the high karma count + the age of the account to scam people on buy/sell subreddits. You need to take precautions and be safe whenever you are making a transaction online.
Computer scams
Virus scam
A popup or other ad will say that you have a virus and you need to follow their advice in order to remove it. They are lying, and either want you to install malware or pay for their software.

Assorted scams

Chinese Brushing / direct shipping
If you have ever received an unsolicited small package from China, your address was used to brush. Vendors place fake orders for their own products and send out the orders so that they can increase their ratings.
Money flipping
Scammer claims to be a banking insider who can double/triple/bazoople any amount of money you send them, with no consequences of any kind. Obviously, the money disappears into their wallet the moment you send it.

Door to door scams

As a general rule, you should not engage with door to door salesmen. If you are interested in the product they are selling, check online first.
Selling Magazines
Someone or a group will come to your door and offer to sell a magazine subscription. Often the subscriptions are not for the duration or price you were told, and the magazines will often have tough or impossible cancellation policies.
Energy sales
Somebody will come to your door claiming to be from an energy company. They will ask to see your current energy bill so that they can see how much you pay. They will then offer you a discount if you sign up with them, and promise to handle everything with your old provider. Some of these scammers will "slam" you, by using your account number that they saw on your bill to switch you to their service without authorization, and some will scam you by charging higher prices than the ones you agreed on.
Security system scams
Scammers will come to your door and ask about your security system, and offer to sell you a new one. These scammers are either selling you overpriced low quality products, or are casing your home for a future burglary.
They ask to enter your home
While trying to sell you whatever, they suddenly need to use your bathroom, or they've been writing against the wall and ask to use your table instead. Or maybe they just moved into the neighborhood and want to see how you decorate for ideas.
They're scoping out you and your place. They want to see what valuables you have, how gullible you are, if you have a security system or dogs, etc.

Street scams

Begging With a Purpose
"I just need a few more dollars for the bus," at the bus station, or "I just need $5 to get some gas," at a gas station. There's also a variation where you will be presented with a reward: "I just need money for a cab to get uptown, but I'll give you sports tickets/money/a date/a priceless vase."
Three Card Monte, Also Known As The Shell Game
Unbeatable. The people you see winning are in on the scam.
Drop and Break
You bump into someone and they drop their phone/glasses/fancy bottle of wine/priceless vase and demand you pay them back. In reality, it's a $2 pair of reading glasses/bottle of three-buck-chuck/tasteful but affordable vase.
CD Sales
You're handed a free CD so you can check out the artist's music. They then ask for your name and immediately write it on the CD. Once they've signed your name, they ask you for money, saying they can't give it to someone else now. Often they use dry erase markers, or cheap CD sleeves. Never use any type of storage device given to you by a random person, as the device can contain malware.
White Van Speaker Scam
You're approached and offered speakers/leather jackets/other luxury goods at a discount. The scammer will have an excuse as to why the price is so low. After you buy them, you'll discover that they are worthless.
iPhone Street Sale
You're approached and shown an iPhone for sale, coming in the box, but it's open and you can see the phone. If you buy the phone, you'll get an iPhone box with no iPhone, just some stones or cheap metal in it to weigh it down.
Buddhist Monk Pendant
A monk in traditional garb approaches you, hands you a gold trinket, and asks for a donation. He holds either a notebook with names and amounts of donation (usually everyone else has donated $5+), or a leaflet with generic info. This is fairly common in NYC, and these guys get aggressive quickly.
Friendship Bracelet Scam More common in western Europe, you're approached by someone selling bracelets. They quickly wrap a loop of fabric around your finger and pull it tight, starting to quickly weave a bracelet. The only way to (easily) get it off your hand is to pay. Leftover sales
This scam involves many different items, but the idea is usually the same: you are approached by someone who claims to have a large amount of excess inventory and offers to sell it to you at a great price. The scammer actually has low quality items and will lie to you about the price/origin of the items.
Dent repair scams
Scammers will approach you in public about a dent in your car and offer to fix it for a low price. Often they will claim that they are mechanics. They will not fix the dent in your car, but they will apply large amounts of wax or other substances to hide the dent while they claim that the substance requires time to harden.
Gold ring/jewelry/valuable item scam
A scammer will "find" a gold ring or other valuable item and offers to sell it to you. The item is fake and you will never see the scammer again.
Distraction theft
One person will approach you and distract you, while their accomplice picks your pockets. The distraction can take many forms, but if you are a tourist and are approached in public, watch closely for people getting close to you.

General resources

Site to report scams in the United Kingdom: http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/
Site to report scams in the United States: https://www.ic3.gov/default.aspx
Site to report scams in Canada: www.antifraudcentre-centreantifraude.ca/reportincident-signalerincident/index-eng.htm
Site to report scams in Europe: https://www.europol.europa.eu/report-a-crime/report-cybercrime-online
FTC scam alerts: https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/scam-alerts
Microsoft's anti-scam guide: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/safety/online-privacy/avoid-phone-scams.aspx
https://www.usa.gov/common-scams-frauds
https://www.usa.gov/scams-and-frauds
https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/features/scam-alerts
https://www.fbi.gov/scams-and-safety/common-fraud-schemes
submitted by EugeneBYMCMB to Scams [link] [comments]

How I earn a Full-time income online + Offers & More

So first start by saying I have "Real" Online work but it requires me to work about 30 mins a day... I work on this other stuff 8-10 hours a day and earn a full-time income alone from this stuff alone...
I'm not including any affiliate signs ups I get when I say earning a living from this
I highly advise you get a cheap Laptop to work on... You cant use your phone ( for the work stuff )
I would recommend something like a Thinkpad 430i, I'm pretty sure I bought one for £85 as I needed a cheap laptop for something else and its been solid
normally they come with dud batteries, You can find a replacement HERE
Appen | non-ref ( I will get $25 if you work I think its 100 hours )
Neevo
Clickworker | non-Ref ( I will get 5 when you earn 10 )
Prolific.co
Populus Live
GG2U $1 Bonus | non-ref ( No Bonus ) - I will get 5% of what you earn
Timebucks(I think $1 bonus) | Non-Ref ( No Bonus ) - I will earn 15% of what you earn

Panelbase - Sign up HERE ( Quidco £10 Bonus )| Non- Ref ( No Bonus ) - Quidco will pay you £0.80p to sign up and if you sign up through my link you will also get a £10 bonus on Quidco when you reach £5 cashback
Some decent surveys on here, I normally check and do them when they are over £1

I mainly focus my time on Appen, If there is no work on Appen then I will see if there are tasks on Neevo if not then I move to the other sites... I only use the lower-paying survey sites when I have nothing else to do
I still do have something that guaranteed you money regardless, So even if I have a slow do saying this there is no pressure because my other work is there. This past week happen has been slow for me but I was able to smash out thousands of tasks on Neevo which made that up
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Here is also some good offers on a few different sites, They should be the highest paying for that offer
TopCashBack - REF (£5 BONUS ) | NON-REF( NO BONUS)
You will get the bonus once you reach £10 payable cashback
Once you have signed up, here are the offers
They also have a £15 Cashback on a Just Eat order of £15, Worth it for some free food
Betfair Poker - £50 Cashback for signing up and playing £10 of poker | £10 Spend
GiffGaff - £10 Cashback - Order and activate a new sim, The Cheapest package is £6
SearchLoto - £0.82 - Create your account, Make 25 Searched, and use Free Ticket.
Experian - £3 - Sign up for a new account
Graze - £2.47, Order your first box then cancel when it arrives
Totally Money - £2.10 - Make an account and get a free credit report
Tastecard - £3.30 - Free 2 Months trial
Booking buddy - 2p ( Can do 3x per day ) - Make a search.
Quidco - REF ( £10 Bonus ) | NON-REF ( NO BONUS )
Bonus is once you reach £5 cashback
Azimo - £25 Cashback - Make a Minimum Transfer of £151 ( Send the transfer to your other account )
Paddy Power Games £20 Cashback - Deposit and wager £10
Panelbase - £0.80p - Create an account and do a survey ( I highly recommend using this site )
Pick My Postcode - £.80p - Create an account.
booking buddy - 2p ( Can do 3x per day ) - Make a search.
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Swagbucks - REF ( Around £4 BONUS ) | NON-REF ( NO BONUS )
To get the £4 bonus you need to earn 300SB in your first month, Since the offers at the bottom I would do the two offers listed, Then make the rest up by doing 3/4 Surveys but other than this please do not waste your time on Swagbucks doing surveys, I only do them if to complete swago or if they are pretty high paying.
AyeT- CyberGhost VPN Free Trial - 54SB
Adgem - Norton VPN Free Trial - 63SB
100SB Bonus - Install the Swagbutton
Rise of Kingdoms - 4000SB - Get to hall Level 17
Lottoland - 1300SB - Click the offer and it will take you to the sign-up and will cost £1 ( Make sure auto-renewal isn't on )
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GG2U - REF( I think you get $1 Bonus ) | NON-REF ( No $1 if there is a bonus )
William hill ( Find this under Gaming Offers ) - Deposit £10 and wager £10 - Around £27 Back
Normally the Gala offers pay higher but none of them are available anywhere, Normally pay around £40, on TCB or Quidco but they have no offers right now for them
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Ysense - REF( Don't think there is a bonus |NON - REF
Click Offers, Then Offertory
Final Fantasy 100K Power - $10.16. I did this before and I spent £1 and completed really quickly, It was an XP reward I bought, It gave millions of Hero XP which gave enough power
I highly advise you don't waste time on this site doing surveys
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Lionbridge - Like happen but this is more strict and I also found Appen paid more for the Project I am on.
Teamwork- Like Appen and Lionbridge, I have done some work for them in the past everything was fine and paid on time.
Apple at Home Advisor - Work at home Advisor for Apple. Pretty sure they send you an iMac to work on tho I could be wrong
Pretty sure Amazon has remote work also. If you google a company and then "Remote" or at home, It should let you see if they have work
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I had these 3 on a list Its transcription work but Appen, Lionbridge, and Teamwork offer this and probably best going for them.
Rev
transcribeme
GoTranscript
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Sites/Apps that are legit + my thoughts on them
Swagbucks ( Around £4 Bonus ) | non-ref ( No Bonus )
I only do offers on here but I always check other sites before doing them to see if better paying elsewhere and I do swago when it comes up - Do not do surveys unless they are offering a few £ as they normally DQ - Only do Offers, Don't waste your time on anything else
Serpclix| non-ref
You install the plugin and it pops up with a task to search for a website... I barely use it but I would say its worth using for some extra cash ( Some users say £10-£30 a month on here )
Branded Surveys| non-ref
Had a few payouts, Too many DQ would avoid unless nothing else
Life Points
Had some decent paying surveys, But too many DQ.. I would personally avoid
Qmee ( 50p Bonus ) | non-ref ( No Bonus )
In my opinion, it's not worth the time, I do probably 1 or 2 surveys per week and I only touch the ones 75p + unless they take to long... I don't think you should focus anytime on it unless you have nothing else.
Ysense
Don't waste your time, I listed an offer for it above other than them offers.. Don't bother, People only want sign-ups to this cause they pay like 15% of earnings and I think around £5 when someone reached a certain amount
SliceThePie- Don't bother, Its clearly about 10p an hour
HoneyGain ($5 Bonus I think ) | Non- Ref ( No Bonus )
It uses your unused internet in the background, it's perfectly safe personally for me I've not had much luck but it comes down to location and how many devices you are using
20Cogs ( £20 Bonus on cashout ) | Non-ref ( No Bonus )
This is legit but most offers do pay better elsewhere and you need to hit 20 confirmed cogs before they payout, I have done offers on here and have my 20cogs pending but make sure you always check other sites to make sure you are getting the most amount of profit... I mostly do offers on here that I have not seen anywhere else.
PrizeRebel - Don't waste your time.
Microworkers - Can pay decent if you can rattle off some fast task but - Its a pain to get paid, Customer service pretty much ignores you and a lot of the jobs and links are sketchy as hell
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I know nothing about this stuff but you can also teach English online and get paid for it. You might need an ESL certificate. The pay is pretty decent if you can get work If this is something you are interested in I highly advise you do some research for it because its decent work
vipkid- Teach English to kids online, If you want to find more I would advise you to look through Reddit as a lot of users on here use this for work, There are more sites than just this that you can work for, I think they pay from $15-$25 per hour.
QKid- Same as vipkid teaching English online- I think this pays up to $20 per hour
gogokid- Teach English Online $14-25 per hour
There will be more sites than this but these are the ones I know of.
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Amazon FBA
I don't recommend you bring crap in from china there is enough of that,,, My advise would start small, Start by Buying stock from Supermarkets or other online retailers this is called retail arbitrage and then sending that in but make sure you are allowed to sell in that category, also if your going down the video game route that you sell Used video games and older back catalog titles as these hold higher profit margins than new stock, Lego, Toys, etc are good things to keep an eye out for you can also look for this sort of stuff on the Facebook market place
There is very little profit in new stock unless you can pick it up and most of the time you'd be selling at a loss because the big retailers can sell it for the price you buy it
Use Amazons courier ( they use ups) it's like £5 to send in a 15KG Box
Get the hang of it to figure out what works for YOU! Don't follow anyone on youtube and what they say to do... Of course, if you want to make serious money which you can do, You will need to get suppliers, etc but no one will tell you where to get these, and the ones found easily through google search will make you very little if any money using... Here is also some things I recommend using ( I use them or have used them )
Barcode Scanner ( I only use my PC so need scanner )
Barcode Scanner With Stand
Epson XP-3100
FBA Labels
Bags - I use a mixture of different one but these are fine for smaller things.
You don't need to buy the best printer or anything like that these work perfectly fine... You only need that stuff if you're doing thousands of labels per day
As I said before, Don't be scared to try this its actually pretty fun and can make good money just please people on youtube UK and US, Try it see what works for you
Also Amazon handmade but I still think Facebook is a great way to start selling handmade stuff ( if its quality )
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Gambling
First, I recommend you don't touch anything to do with this stuff if you have any mental health problems, feel lonely, etc this can ruin your life if you go off the deep end
Matched Betting - You can make good money from this and I think everyone should do it, It's not complicated once you get the hang of it but don't use Profit Accumulator or the other one that charges £17 a month, in my opinion, it isn't worth it ... You could use something like Team Profit to get the hang of it and then take the £1 profit accumulator trial then get more info from there but cancel before the £17 month
The more money you have to do this the more you're going to make, It can be pretty slow if you are starting with a low amount of money but when you're doing these, Make sure you check cashback sites or offerwalls to see if they will pay you for signing up
People promote PA because they have a good affiliate program

Gambling CPA/RS
This is different and you need a website or social media platform, You would have deals with the casinos, Bookmakers, etc But the money, if you get it right, is absolutely ridiculous... This is why you see these guys on youtube spinning such high amount of cash on the casino, If you are good at building sites or have a boatload of cash to chuck at this
You would post them and when people sign up through your link you could be on CPA ( Cost per Acquisition ) RS= Revenue share, So you would get % of a player losses or you could be on a hybrid
This money is life-changing if you get it right but since there is so much cash it is not easy... These sites are spending 10s of thousands a month to be at the top search results.
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Cashback Websites
JoinHoney | non-ref - Saves you money by searching for coupon codes, I place a monthly order on a website and it saves me between 20-40 each time, Well worth installing when you shop online
TopCashBack (£5 Bonus ) | nonref ( No Bonus )
£5 Bonus once you reach £10 payable cashback, I listed some good deals at the top of the post ( Check yourself for more on the site ) Also can save money when shopping online
Quidco (£10 Bonus) |non-ref ( No bonus )
You get the £10 bonus once you reach £5 cashback, Same as top cashback... Some offers listed above and you can also get cashback shopping online
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My favorite Offer
Xendpay (£10 Bonus | non-ref( No bonus )
Sign up and Verify your account, Make a transfer of £100 and you will get £10 free.. You can just transfer the money to yourself but you will need an account that takes euros as you need to send £ to euro
-
Before you sign up to an offer on this sub, Please check on cashback sites to see if they pay more than a ref link, Example is the Azimo link it has been posted on this sub on the past few days, You only get £10 from that but you will get £25 through Quidco + £10 bonus if you are new to the site
There is also a scam that's posted a lot on Reddit, They claim to pay you $25 to sign up then $25 per person you sign up, This is a scam they go by a few different names sites all look the same with the same fake payouts
I hope this helps someone out.
submitted by StrangeDeal6 to beermoneyuk [link] [comments]

Looking for Oyster knife suggestions

Kind of a different suggestion post than what's usually posted here, but I'm moving to a new station at work and am gonna have to do a lot of oysters and don't have one in my kit.
Budget limit would be sub $100, and I would prefer something that would be comfortable in my big hands and that can work with me instead of against me.
Also would love something aesthetically pleasing, but that is secondary to performance
submitted by Hunginthe514 to chefknives [link] [comments]

The one thread about cell phone service in Japan.

It seems like every day of the week there are people asking the same questions about getting cell phone service in Japan, and instead of having separate threads I think that one megathread should cover most of people's needs altogether. Hopefully some other people agree with me on this.
Disclaimer: I am neither affiliated nor do I have acquaintances with anyone in the telecom industry. I don't get paid at all for this post. This is not an advertisement or endorsement for any particular provider at all. Read all the fine prints before you sign any contract.

Terminologies

Just stating what I think is more relevant at the beginning.
初期費用: initial fees. Usually contains 契約料 (see below) along with a SIMカード発行料 (SIM card issuance fee) of ~400 yen if it's a MVNO.
契約料: activation fee. This is almost a flat 3000 yen + tax for most providers out there, save special cases like Sakura Mobile. If you go to a physical store to sign up for a contract, you are almost always required to pay this. Amazon.co.jp offers a variety of "start-up" MVNO packages with activation fee waivers, so it may be worthwhile to check it out.
料金プラン: your monthly plan. Have fun.
契約解除料、解約金、違約金: contract cancellation fees; early termination fee (ETF) for the American folks. The rest of English-speaking countries, you're on your own. As of October 2019, telecoms are required to limit the ETF to at most 1,000 yen for new contracts, but this does not include ETFs for secondary contracts like those alluring cashback bonuses or free iPhone Ultrasonic Dragula MAX XXXIV deals offered by box superstores. Do note that if you purchase a phone through a provider on a payment plan, you will still have to continue paying for the phone since most payment plans can be 24 to 36 months.
契約更新期間、契約更新月: this is the time when you're allowed to cancel or haggle for better terms on your cell phone contract without incurring an ETF. Once this period is up, your contract may be automatically renewed. Be sure to cancel your contract within this period or you may see a drastic increase in cost starting with your next bill (since your initial deals have already expired and you're consenting to renewing a contract without discounts).

The Big Three

These guys have their own cellular network and usually subcontract some of their capacity to MVNOs. They also have the most number of retail stores in Japan. Docomo is red, Softbank has that white oto-san Hokkaido-inu, and au has those weird commercials. They also offer a variety of other services like landline internet, home security and cashless payment services, so there are bundle discount possibilities.
And yes, they are more expensive but are usually more reliable. And because they own the network, they almost always have the fastest speeds at all times of the day, save for congestion like during rush hours and lunch break hours.
Just going to list the Big Three here: leaving research to you as an exercise.
Okay, fine, I lied. There is a fourth player in the Big Three League. Rakuten just annouced a few days ago that their own network buildout has reached a stage where they're going to start trial service in early April this year. Rakuten Mobile will have native coverage in Tokyo, Osaka and Nagoya with au backup in the rest of the country. There is only one plan: 2980 yen/month, unlimited data and voice with global data roaming up to 2GB. Unlimited data only covers data carried by Rakuten's own network; transmissions over the partner work are capped at 2GB a month before your speeds get throttled. Rakuten is still operating as a MVNO until their own network goes live, and does have a one-year free promotion for the first 3 million subscribers at the time of writing.
Payment options: domestic credit card or bank account. You may also be able to pay at convenience stores if you're willing to pony up additional transaction fees (IIRC Softbank will charge you a service fee of 500 yen per month and they will issue you a payment slip in snail mail).

MVNOs

This isn't a replacement for the Wiki, so I'm going to be brief. Besides the Big Three, everyone else is, well, everyone else. They're virtual telecoms piggybacking on the Big Three's network. I am going to roughly divide them into three categories: W, X, and Y. Not ABC or 123 because that sort of implies I have some sort of bias in ranking those.
A good place to see how fast a provider is is over at みんなのネット回線速度.

Category W: fast and expensive

This category contains MVNOs that are direct subsidiaries of the Big Three. Speed-wise, they have almost always consistently been benchmarked to be the absolute front of the pack. Cost-wise, they are also pretty much the front of the pack.
UQ: KDDI's own MVNO. Aside from LTE service, they also have WiMax. Will accept a domestic bank account in lieu of a credit card.
Y! Mobile: SoftBank's own MVNO. Can pay with bank account transfers as well.
OCN is part of the NTT group, although speed-wise it’s apparently not always in the same tier as UQ or Y! Mobile; however one distinct feature is that its speeds tend to be consistent and they apparently do not enforce a speed restriction (速度制限) if you manage to use up more than a certain amount of bandwidth within a short period of time (a typical example is Softbank’s 1 GB/3 day limit).
Biglobe Mobile is a little different from UQ. While it's a KDDI subsidiary, I think the parent company is not 100% connected to au (Biglobe is a landline internet provider themselves). Speed-wise BM is generally slower than UQ, and their prices align more with Cat X'ers.

Category X: your everyday provider

For the lack of a better term: this is basically everyone else. Most MVNO's fall into this category. Most of X piggyback off NTT Docomo's network, but there are a few on other networks (回線) too, such as mineo, IIJmio, Line Mobile and b-mobile.

Category Y: specialty guys

This is really part of Category X, but because I am tired of seeing blind recommendations for them left and right I've decided to just put them out in a different category and address them separately here.
If you speak no Japanese and have no patience to do your own research, ask a colleague, take a trip down to Yodobashi/Bic Camera/Yamada Denki/that other electronic box superstore run and overrun by tourists from a certain country, the following three carriers offer English webpages and customer service:
Sakura Mobile
Mobal
GTN Mobile
IIRC Sakura Mobile runs off NTT Docomo, and Mobal and GTN are Softbank. These companies are more expensive in their plans, but they offer English customer service as their go-to feature. Sakura Mobile, for example, has a standard activation fee of 15,000 yen when everyone else is 3000, and have a higher starting price tier than most others. GTN Mobile has a higher-than-average calling rate (25 yen/30 seconds instead of 20/30). Mobal's monthly plan is 4500 yen. The plus? They'll accept foreign credit cards and offer you English customer service.

Quick Q and A's

Q: How much should I expect to pay for a basic cell phone plan with, say, 3GB of data?

A: 3GB tends to be the starting tier for most MVNOs, and typically are 1500 to 1800 yen a month with pay-as-you-go voice at a typical rate of 20 yen per 30-second block. Voice buckets are typically available as options at < 1000 yen. The Big Three will cost a bit more than these prices for a comparable plan, however.

Q: Can I go without voice service?

A: Yes you can. Most MVNOs have such an option.

Q: I don't have a Japanese credit card! What do I do?

A: The Big Three will accept bank payments, as do UQ and Y! Mobile. Line Mobile allows you to bill their service to Line Pay, the cashless payment system they operate. Some others may allow foreign credit cards, so please search the comments section to see which ones people have had experience with.

Q: What do I need to sign up for a contract?

A: You need to have your address registered at your local municipality office (市役所、区役所) if you have just arrived in Japan. Your zairyu card (在留カード) is usually enough, but some MVNOs like Line require a jyuminhyo (住民票) as well. If you sign up online most will ask you to upload photos of these ID's.

Q: Who should I sign up with?

A: Go ask your mother. Or your landlord. Or your colleague. Or your friends. Or the ojiisan who is always seen sitting on the steps to your local shrine and fanning his nether region with a uchiwa. They should know your local network coverage better than randos on the intarweb.

Q: Will my phone purchased overseas work?

A: willmyphonework.net

Q: I’m not staying in Japan that long so I don’t want a contract. What do?

A: NTT Docomo in some cases does not levy an ETF. MVNOs like UQ and OCN do not have an ETF either. Some provider, for instance mineo, may choose to charge you a more expensive MNP (number porting) fee if you decide to leave with your current number before the contract is up for renewal.

Q: What if I just want a Japanese number and will never make calls, text or need internet?

A: SoftBank Simple Style, maybe?

Q: Why do you seem to have an issue against Category Y?

A: I don't; they exist to serve an arguably niche market and I am okay with that. I however have an issue with people recommending them as the end-all-be-all solution to the cell phone problem. It’s silly not to consider coverage first, despite how well built out Japan’s cellular network may be; even with the Big Three there will be dead spots somewhere. You don’t speak Japanese and want English service? Guess what, b-mobile and IIJmio also provide some degree of English service as well. Or head down to Bic or Yodobashi Camera where cheery salesclerks will try to bend over backwards and exhaust all of the words they know in English to accommodate you. The Big Three also have English-speaking agents at some of their bigger stores with lots of foot traffic. Price-wise a lot of these specialty providers are also not so competitive. Sure, Sakura’s 3GB plan had a voice minute bucket, but so do most MVNOs as options, meaning that if you don’t need a lot of voice, you have a choice whether you want to tack one on. Not to mention that for some bizarre reason Sakura Mobile actually caps their network speed at 20 Mbps (this is buried in their T&C fineprint under Rate Plans), whereas MVNOs routinely break that speed limit. GTN is another one of those. Like Sakura, they bundle in a calling option into their base, charge a higher per-half-minute rate, and requires a separate 150 yen/month for text messages. While most other MVNOs offer to let you roll your unused data over to the next month for free, GTN does not.
Feel free to leave questions and comments below, and hopefully someone will try to help you. よろしくお願いします。
Edit: Added information on GTN Mobile into Cat Y. And thank you, kind stranger, for the award.
submitted by tokidoki_carneasada to japanlife [link] [comments]

Short List of Highest paying Apps & Websites (Including AFK Passive Income)

After a long research here is my short list of apps and websites that generate the most money while at home, use the map at the bottom and choose only 2 or 3 apps/sites:
  1. AppKarma & CashKarma apps (Google Store Ref. links): My favorite money makers. VIP Ref. Code: SMREVIEW for both apps (you get a special +500 points bonus when you follow my link or use my code). Cashkarma is best for surveys, AppKarma is best for games. Nice thing is that CashKarma rewards you with credit even if you get screened out of surveys. Easy Money! Both apps transfer money to PayPal and offer many other gift cards.
  2. Swagbucks (+300 bonus pts): The highest paying site for surveys, installing new apps, playing games, & cashback offers. Can transfer to PayPal along many other gift cards. You can easily make $10 in 2 days. Also, Walmart Cashback!!
  3. RewardXP (Ref. Link): Best thing about RewardXP is that they filtered out all the useless offers to present you with only the highest paying & legit offers. You can choose to play mobile games, take surveys, or play Autoplay videos by Hideout TV! They pay the highest for watching Hideout TV compared to other reward sites! Site is easy to load on PC & on phone. Rewards: Paypal, Steam, Amazon. You start with $0.5 bonus by following my link.
  4. Gamehag (Ref. Link): Or use code: GH1750825 Hands down the best site for PC users to get Steam Wallet and Amazon gift cards. Play high quality PC games like Warframe, War Thunder, etc..and get rewarded for it! Also download the App to watch ads. I earned more than $300 Amazon credit and BF1 & BF5 & Star Wars BF2 for free on Gamehag so far! Can also get free steam keys and free skins.
  5. Pollpay (Google Store Non-Ref Link): Use code: 5Y8G7PXUHG for $0.3 signup bonus. Very easy to use survey app, money goes straight to your PayPal. I do them while on the road in a bus or a train. Minimum checkout to PayPal is $5.
  6. Fitplay (Google Store Ref Link): If you use the Ref. link you get +25% of all my generated coins for life, pretty good deal for passive money. Follow this link on your phone; takes you to playstore: Fitplay Referral Link Let it sit and run games and you passively earn credits. You can cash out with PayPal, Amazon, or Starbucks
  7. Mistplay (Google Store Ref Link): (+50 points for you, if you use the ref link on your phone) Let it sit and run games and you passively earn credits. You can cash out with Amazon credit or Visa or Starbucks or Cineplex.
HELP ME CHOOSE WHICH APP OR SITE IS BEST FOR ME? No problem, use this map:
It took me a while to narrow down this shortlist. I am happy to share my results with you. If you like it, kindly use my referral codes and referral links as a thank you. If you have any questions about any of these please send me a message. Have Fun!

GUIDES TO HELP YOU EARN FASTER
A. Gamehag Guide to Earn Gems:
  1. Download their app and play videos under App Zone. You will earn 300 gems every day. Very easy. Do it while you are playing on the PC or working or whatever...
  2. Play their PC games! On their site go to "Get More > Games" and choose a PC game to play. For example, War Thunder will earn you 5,000 gems right now, that's around $5.5! Play all these games and submit the tasks. They are fun to play.
  3. Complete contracts on your mobile phone under "Get More > Contracts". Wall of the Universe, Wall of Anxiety, and Wall of Terror have the highest paying mobile tasks (install apps, mobile games).
  4. Disable all ADBLOCK on Gamehag in order for them to track your tasks & reward you.
I am your friend on Gamehag, access my profile and look at the rewards I have redeemed so far. It is easy. Let me know if you need more help.
B. CashKarma Guide:
  1. After you download using my link or use my referral code, message me and I will reply with CashKarma guide to earn points quickly.
C. RewardXP & Hideout TV Guide:
  1. For Every 1,000 points on Hideout TV you get 10,000 XP on RewardXP which is $1.
  2. DISABLE ADBLOCK! Hideout TV is a safe website don't worry but they can only reward you using their ad revenue. I am also paranoid so what i do is I use a different browser (Chrome) on my PC with all Adblocks OFF just to play videos on Hideout TV. I don't use Chrome for any other browsing activities. Win-Win.
  3. Make sure to register to Hideout using the same email address you used for RewardXP so you can eventually redeem your points from Hideout TV to RewardXP, and then from RewardXP to Paypal or Amazon or Steam etc..
  4. Hideout TV is meant for long hours of video play, not 30 secs. Nice thing is it autoplays for you. But after 4-5 hours it stops & asks you "Are you still there?"
  5. DO NOT MINIMIZE THE BROWSER. The video will sometimes pause if you do so and interrupt your reward stream. So yes it is passive income but you have to dedicate a computer or smartphone for it. No multitasking.
  6. RewardXP also has an awesome games and surveys sections, use them to grow your earnings.
submitted by benefactor007 to referralcodes [link] [comments]

Is it just me, or is there somewhat of a PSU shortage at the moment?

Hey guys,
So I've been looking around trying to find a semi-decent PSU that is less than 600w to use as part of a Minecraft server PC build - I've had no issues finding most of the parts I'm after for decent prices (well, at least, decent prices considering the current circumstances...), but the PSU is eluding me.
I don't know if it's just me, or just in the UK or something, but it seems that most PSU's at the moment are either unavailable or "item has not been released" (which can't be true, as most of these PSU's have been out for years) on Amazon.
Here are some examples:
Corsair VS650 650W - Item is not yet released.
EVGA 600 W1- Item is out of stock.
EVGA 450 B3 - Item has not yet been released.
Seasonic Focus Plus Gold 550W - Item has not yet been released.
It's not just Amazon either, here are some other examples from various UK suppliers:
Corsair TX650M - PC world, Unavailable.
EVGA 600 BR - CCL, "Coming soon".
Corsair CX550 - Corsair, Notify me when in stock.
It's only once you start to get to PSU's that are over £80 (which is to much for a budget server build in my opinion) that you start to find some in stock, like this Seasonic Focus GX 550W.
So, has anyone else found this, especially when looking at budget PSU's? Why is it out of all components, that PSU's seem to be the only ones widely out of stock?
submitted by die247 to buildapc [link] [comments]

Short List of Highest Paying Apps & Websites

After a long research here is my short list of apps and websites that generate the most money while at home, use the map at the bottom and choose only 2 or 3 apps/sites:
  1. AppKarma & CashKarma apps (Google Store Ref. links): My favorite money makers. VIP Ref. Code: SMREVIEW for both apps (you get a special +500 points bonus when you follow my link or use my code). Cashkarma is best for surveys, AppKarma is best for games. Nice thing is that CashKarma rewards you with credit even if you get screened out of surveys. Easy Money! Both apps transfer money to PayPal and offer many other gift cards.
  2. Swagbucks (+300 bonus pts): The highest paying site for surveys, installing new apps, playing games, & cashback offers. Can transfer to PayPal along many other gift cards. You can easily make $10 in 2 days. Also, Walmart Cashback!!
  3. RewardXP (Ref. Link): Best thing about RewardXP is that they filtered out all the useless offers to present you with only the highest paying & legit offers. You can choose to play mobile games, take surveys, or play Autoplay videos by Hideout TV! They pay the highest for watching Hideout TV compared to other reward sites! Site is easy to load on PC & on phone. Rewards: Paypal, Steam, Amazon. You start with $0.5 bonus by following my link.
  4. Gamehag (Ref. Link): Or use code: GH1750825 Hands down the best site for PC users to get Steam Wallet and Amazon gift cards. Play high quality PC games like Warframe, War Thunder, etc..and get rewarded for it! Also download the App to watch ads. I earned more than $300 Amazon credit and BF1 & BF5 & Star Wars BF2 for free on Gamehag so far! Can also get free steam keys and free skins.
  5. Pollpay (Google Store Non-Ref Link): Use code: 5Y8G7PXUHG for $0.3 signup bonus. Very easy to use survey app, money goes straight to your PayPal. I do them while on the road in a bus or a train. Minimum checkout to PayPal is $5.
  6. Fitplay (Google Store Ref Link): If you use the Ref. link you get +25% of all my generated coins for life, pretty good deal for passive money. Follow this link on your phone; takes you to playstore: Fitplay Referral Link Let it sit and run games and you passively earn credits. You can cash out with PayPal, Amazon, or Starbucks
  7. Mistplay (Google Store Ref Link): (+50 points for you, if you use the ref link on your phone) Let it sit and run games and you passively earn credits. You can cash out with Amazon credit or Visa or Starbucks or Cineplex.
HELP ME CHOOSE WHICH APP OR SITE IS BEST FOR ME? No problem, use this map:
It took me a while to narrow down this shortlist. I am happy to share my results with you. If you like it, kindly use my referral codes and referral links as a thank you. If you have any questions about any of these please send me a message. Have Fun!

GUIDES TO HELP YOU EARN FASTER
A. Gamehag Guide to Earn Gems:
  1. Download their app and play videos under App Zone. You will earn 300 gems every day. Very easy. Do it while you are playing on the PC or working or whatever...
  2. Play their PC games! On their site go to "Get More > Games" and choose a PC game to play. For example, War Thunder will earn you 5,000 gems right now, that's around $5.5! Play all these games and submit the tasks. They are fun to play.
  3. Complete contracts on your mobile phone under "Get More > Contracts". Wall of the Universe, Wall of Anxiety, and Wall of Terror have the highest paying mobile tasks (install apps, mobile games).
  4. Disable all ADBLOCK on Gamehag in order for them to track your tasks & reward you.
I am your friend on Gamehag, access my profile and look at the rewards I have redeemed so far. It is easy. Let me know if you need more help.
B. CashKarma Guide:
  1. After you download using my link or use my referral code, message me and I will reply with CashKarma guide to earn points quickly.
C. RewardXP & Hideout TV Guide:
  1. For Every 1,000 points on Hideout TV you get 10,000 XP on RewardXP which is $1.
  2. DISABLE ADBLOCK! Hideout TV is a safe website don't worry but they can only reward you using their ad revenue. I am also paranoid so what i do is I use a different browser (Chrome) on my PC with all Adblocks OFF just to play videos on Hideout TV. I don't use Chrome for any other browsing activities. Win-Win.
  3. Make sure to register to Hideout using the same email address you used for RewardXP so you can eventually redeem your points from Hideout TV to RewardXP, and then from RewardXP to Paypal or Amazon or Steam etc..
  4. Hideout TV is meant for long hours of video play, not 30 secs. Nice thing is it autoplays for you. But after 4-5 hours it stops & asks you "Are you still there?"
  5. DO NOT MINIMIZE THE BROWSER. The video will sometimes pause if you do so and interrupt your reward stream. So yes it is passive income but you have to dedicate a computer or smartphone for it. No multitasking.
  6. RewardXP also has an awesome games and surveys sections, use them to grow your earnings.
submitted by benefactor007 to beermoneyAus [link] [comments]

Oracle’s BlueKai tracks you across the web. That data spilled online – TechCrunch

Article included for those not wanting all the trackers and scripts

Oracle’s BlueKai tracks you across the web. That data spilled online – TechCrunch

Zack [email protected] / 2:30 pm GMT•June 19, 2020
Have you ever wondered why online ads appear for things that you were just thinking about?
There’s no big conspiracy. Ad tech can be creepily accurate.
Tech giant Oracle is one of a few companies in Silicon Valley that has near-perfected the art of tracking people across the internet. The company has spent a decade and billions of dollars buying startups to build its very own panopticon of users’ web browsing data.
One of those startups, BlueKai, which Oracle bought for a little over $400 million in 2014, is barely known outside marketing circles, but it amassed one of the largest banks of web tracking data outside of the federal government.
BlueKai uses website cookies and other tracking tech to follow you around the web. By knowing which websites you visit and which emails you open, marketers can use this vast amount of tracking data to infer as much about you as possible — your income, education, political views, and interests to name a few — in order to target you with ads that should match your apparent tastes. If you click, the advertisers make money.
But for a time, that web tracking data was spilling out onto the open internet because a server was left unsecured and without a password, exposing billions of records for anyone to find.
Security researcher Anurag Sen found the database and reported his finding to Oracle through an intermediary — Roi Carthy, chief executive at cybersecurity firm Hudson Rock and former TechCrunch reporter.
TechCrunch reviewed the data shared by Sen and found names, home addresses, email addresses and other identifiable data in the database. The data also revealed sensitive users’ web browsing activity — from purchases to newsletter unsubscribes.
“There’s really no telling how revealing some of this data can be,” said Bennett Cyphers, a staff technologist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, told TechCrunch.
“Oracle is aware of the report made by Roi Carthy of Hudson Rock related to certain BlueKai records potentially exposed on the Internet,” said Oracle spokesperson Deborah Hellinger. “While the initial information provided by the researcher did not contain enough information to identify an affected system, Oracle’s investigation has subsequently determined that two companies did not properly configure their services. Oracle has taken additional measures to avoid a reoccurrence of this issue.”
Oracle did not name the companies or say what those additional measures were, and declined to answer our questions or comment further.
But the sheer size of the exposed database makes this one of the largest security lapses this year.

The more it knows

BlueKai relies on vacuuming up a never-ending supply of data from a variety of sources to understand trends to deliver the most precise ads to a person’s interests.
Marketers can either tap into Oracle’s enormous bank of data, which it pulls in from credit agencies, analytics firms, and other sources of consumer data including billions of daily location data points, in order to target their ads. Or marketers can upload their own data obtained directly from consumers, such as the information you hand over when you register an account on a website or when you sign up for a company’s newsletter.
But BlueKai also uses more covert tactics like allowing websites to embed invisible pixel-sized images to collect information about you as soon as you open the page — hardware, operating system, browser and any information about the network connection.
This data — known as a web browser’s “user agent” — may not seem sensitive, but when fused together it can create a unique “fingerprint” of a person’s device, which can be used to track that person as they browse the internet.
BlueKai can also tie your mobile web browsing habits to your desktop activity, allowing it to follow you across the internet no matter which device you use.
Say a marketer wants to run a campaign trying to sell a new car model. In BlueKai’s case, it already has a category of “car enthusiasts” — and many other, more specific categories — that the marketer can use to target with ads. Anyone who’s visited a car maker’s website or a blog that includes a BlueKai tracking pixel might be categorized as a “car enthusiast.” Over time that person will be siloed into different categories under a profile that learns as much about you to target you with those ads.
The technology is far from perfect. Harvard Business Review found earlier this year that the information collected by data brokers, such as Oracle, can vary wildly in quality.
But some of these platforms have proven alarmingly accurate.
In 2012, Target mailed maternity coupons to a high school student after an in-house analytics system figured out she was pregnant — before she had even told her parents — because of the data it collected from her web browsing.
Some might argue that’s precisely what these systems are designed to do.
Jonathan Mayer, a science professor at Princeton University, told TechCrunch that BlueKai is one of the leading systems for linking data.
“If you have the browser send an email address and a tracking cookie at the same time, that’s what you need to build that link,” he said.
The end goal: the more BlueKai collects, the more it can infer about you, making it easier to target you with ads that might entice you to that magic money-making click.
But marketers can’t just log in to BlueKai and download reams of personal information from its servers, one marketing professional told TechCrunch. The data is sanitized and masked so that marketers never see names, addresses or any other personal data.
As Mayer explained: BlueKai collects personal data; it doesn’t share it with marketers.

‘No telling how revealing’

Behind the scenes, BlueKai continuously ingests and matches as much raw personal data as it can against each person’s profile, constantly enriching that profile data to make sure it’s up to date and relevant.
But it was that raw data spilling out of the exposed database.
TechCrunch found records containing details of private purchases. One record detailed how a German man, whose name we’re withholding, used a prepaid debit card to place a €10 bet on an esports betting site on April 19. The record also contained the man’s address, phone number and email address.
Another record revealed how one of the largest investment holding companies in Turkey used BlueKai to track users on its website. The record detailed how one person, who lives in Istanbul, ordered $899 worth of furniture online from a homeware store. We know because the record contained all of these details, including the buyer’s name, email address and the direct web address for the buyer’s order, no login needed.
We also reviewed a record detailing how one person unsubscribed from an email newsletter run by an electronics consumer, sent to his iCloud address. The record showed that the person may have been interested in a specific model of car dash-cam. We can even tell based on his user agent that his iPhone was out of date and needed a software update.
The more BlueKai collects, the more it can infer about you, making it easier to target you with ads that might entice you to that magic money-making click.
The data went back for months, according to Sen, who discovered the database. Some logs dated back to August 2019, he said.
“Fine-grained records of people’s web-browsing habits can reveal hobbies, political affiliation, income bracket, health conditions, sexual preferences, and — as evident here — gambling habits,” said the EFF’s Cyphers. “As we live more of our lives online, this kind of data accounts for a larger and larger portion of how we spend our time.”
Oracle declined to say if it informed those whose data was exposed about the security lapse. The company also declined to say if it had warned U.S. or international regulators of the incident.
Under California state law, companies like Oracle are required to publicly disclose data security incidents, but Oracle has not to date declared the lapse. When reached, a spokesperson for California’s attorney general’s office declined to say if Oracle had informed the office of the incident.
Under Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation, companies can face fines of up to 4% of their global annual turnover for flouting data protection and disclosure rules.

Trackers, trackers everywhere

BlueKai is everywhere — even when you can’t see it.
One estimate says BlueKai tracks over 1% of all web traffic — an unfathomable amount of daily data collection — and tracks some of the world’s biggest websites: Amazon, ESPN, Forbes, Glassdoor, Healthline, Levi’s, MSN.com, Rotten Tomatoes, and The New York Times. Even this very article has a BlueKai tracker because our parent company, Verizon Media, is a BlueKai partner.
But BlueKai is not alone. Nearly every website you visit contains some form of invisible tracking code that watches you as you traverse the internet.
As invasive as it is that invisible trackers are feeding your web browsing data to a gigantic database in the cloud, it’s that very same data that has kept the internet largely free for so long.
To stay free, websites use advertising to generate revenue. The more targeted the advertising, the better the revenue is supposed to be.
While the majority of web users are not naive enough to think that internet tracking does not exist, few outside marketing circles understand how much data is collected and what is done with it.
Take the Equifax data breach in 2017, which brought scathing criticism from lawmakers after it collected millions of consumers’ data without their explicit consent. Equifax, like BlueKai, relies on consumers skipping over the lengthy privacy policies that govern how websites track them.
In any case, consumers have little choice but to accept the terms. Be tracked or leave the site. That’s the trade-off with a free internet.
But there are dangers with collecting web-tracking data on millions of people.
“Whenever databases like this exist, there’s always a risk the data will end up in the wrong hands and in a position to hurt someone,” said Cyphers.
Cyphers said the data, if in the hands of someone malicious, could contribute to identity theft, phishing or stalking.
“It also makes a valuable target for law enforcement and government agencies who want to piggyback on the data gathering that Oracle already does,” he said.
Even when the data stays where it’s intended, Cyphers said these vast databases enable “manipulative advertising for things like political issues or exploitative services, and it allows marketers to tailor their messages to specific vulnerable populations,” he said.
“Everyone has different things they want to keep private, and different people they want to keep them private from,” said Cyphers. “When companies collect raw web browsing or purchase data, thousands of little details about real people’s lives get scooped up along the way.”
“Each one of those little details has the potential to put somebody at risk,” he said.
Send tips securely over Signal and WhatsApp to +1 646-755-8849.Oracle’s BlueKai tracks you across the web. That data spilled online – TechCrunch
Zack [email protected] / 2:30 pm GMT•June 19, 2020
Have you ever wondered why online ads appear for things that you were just thinking about?
There’s no big conspiracy. Ad tech can be creepily accurate.
Tech giant Oracle is one of a few companies in Silicon Valley that has near-perfected the art of tracking people across the internet. The company has spent a decade and billions of dollars buying startups to build its very own panopticon of users’ web browsing data.
One of those startups, BlueKai, which Oracle bought for a little over $400 million in 2014, is barely known outside marketing circles, but it amassed one of the largest banks of web tracking data outside of the federal government.
BlueKai uses website cookies and other tracking tech to follow you around the web. By knowing which websites you visit and which emails you open, marketers can use this vast amount of tracking data to infer as much about you as possible — your income, education, political views, and interests to name a few — in order to target you with ads that should match your apparent tastes. If you click, the advertisers make money.
But for a time, that web tracking data was spilling out onto the open internet because a server was left unsecured and without a password, exposing billions of records for anyone to find.
Security researcher Anurag Sen found the database and reported his finding to Oracle through an intermediary — Roi Carthy, chief executive at cybersecurity firm Hudson Rock and former TechCrunch reporter.
TechCrunch reviewed the data shared by Sen and found names, home addresses, email addresses and other identifiable data in the database. The data also revealed sensitive users’ web browsing activity — from purchases to newsletter unsubscribes.
“There’s really no telling how revealing some of this data can be,” said Bennett Cyphers, a staff technologist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, told TechCrunch.
“Oracle is aware of the report made by Roi Carthy of Hudson Rock related to certain BlueKai records potentially exposed on the Internet,” said Oracle spokesperson Deborah Hellinger. “While the initial information provided by the researcher did not contain enough information to identify an affected system, Oracle’s investigation has subsequently determined that two companies did not properly configure their services. Oracle has taken additional measures to avoid a reoccurrence of this issue.”
Oracle did not name the companies or say what those additional measures were, and declined to answer our questions or comment further.
But the sheer size of the exposed database makes this one of the largest security lapses this year.

The more it knows

BlueKai relies on vacuuming up a never-ending supply of data from a variety of sources to understand trends to deliver the most precise ads to a person’s interests.
Marketers can either tap into Oracle’s enormous bank of data, which it pulls in from credit agencies, analytics firms, and other sources of consumer data including billions of daily location data points, in order to target their ads. Or marketers can upload their own data obtained directly from consumers, such as the information you hand over when you register an account on a website or when you sign up for a company’s newsletter.
But BlueKai also uses more covert tactics like allowing websites to embed invisible pixel-sized images to collect information about you as soon as you open the page — hardware, operating system, browser and any information about the network connection.
This data — known as a web browser’s “user agent” — may not seem sensitive, but when fused together it can create a unique “fingerprint” of a person’s device, which can be used to track that person as they browse the internet.
BlueKai can also tie your mobile web browsing habits to your desktop activity, allowing it to follow you across the internet no matter which device you use.
Say a marketer wants to run a campaign trying to sell a new car model. In BlueKai’s case, it already has a category of “car enthusiasts” — and many other, more specific categories — that the marketer can use to target with ads. Anyone who’s visited a car maker’s website or a blog that includes a BlueKai tracking pixel might be categorized as a “car enthusiast.” Over time that person will be siloed into different categories under a profile that learns as much about you to target you with those ads.
The technology is far from perfect. Harvard Business Review found earlier this year that the information collected by data brokers, such as Oracle, can vary wildly in quality.
But some of these platforms have proven alarmingly accurate.
In 2012, Target mailed maternity coupons to a high school student after an in-house analytics system figured out she was pregnant — before she had even told her parents — because of the data it collected from her web browsing.
Some might argue that’s precisely what these systems are designed to do.
Jonathan Mayer, a science professor at Princeton University, told TechCrunch that BlueKai is one of the leading systems for linking data.
“If you have the browser send an email address and a tracking cookie at the same time, that’s what you need to build that link,” he said.
The end goal: the more BlueKai collects, the more it can infer about you, making it easier to target you with ads that might entice you to that magic money-making click.
But marketers can’t just log in to BlueKai and download reams of personal information from its servers, one marketing professional told TechCrunch. The data is sanitized and masked so that marketers never see names, addresses or any other personal data.
As Mayer explained: BlueKai collects personal data; it doesn’t share it with marketers.

‘No telling how revealing’

Behind the scenes, BlueKai continuously ingests and matches as much raw personal data as it can against each person’s profile, constantly enriching that profile data to make sure it’s up to date and relevant.
But it was that raw data spilling out of the exposed database.
TechCrunch found records containing details of private purchases. One record detailed how a German man, whose name we’re withholding, used a prepaid debit card to place a €10 bet on an esports betting site on April 19. The record also contained the man’s address, phone number and email address.
Another record revealed how one of the largest investment holding companies in Turkey used BlueKai to track users on its website. The record detailed how one person, who lives in Istanbul, ordered $899 worth of furniture online from a homeware store. We know because the record contained all of these details, including the buyer’s name, email address and the direct web address for the buyer’s order, no login needed.
We also reviewed a record detailing how one person unsubscribed from an email newsletter run by an electronics consumer, sent to his iCloud address. The record showed that the person may have been interested in a specific model of car dash-cam. We can even tell based on his user agent that his iPhone was out of date and needed a software update.
The more BlueKai collects, the more it can infer about you, making it easier to target you with ads that might entice you to that magic money-making click.
The data went back for months, according to Sen, who discovered the database. Some logs dated back to August 2019, he said.
“Fine-grained records of people’s web-browsing habits can reveal hobbies, political affiliation, income bracket, health conditions, sexual preferences, and — as evident here — gambling habits,” said the EFF’s Cyphers. “As we live more of our lives online, this kind of data accounts for a larger and larger portion of how we spend our time.”
Oracle declined to say if it informed those whose data was exposed about the security lapse. The company also declined to say if it had warned U.S. or international regulators of the incident.
Under California state law, companies like Oracle are required to publicly disclose data security incidents, but Oracle has not to date declared the lapse. When reached, a spokesperson for California’s attorney general’s office declined to say if Oracle had informed the office of the incident.
Under Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation, companies can face fines of up to 4% of their global annual turnover for flouting data protection and disclosure rules.

Trackers, trackers everywhere

BlueKai is everywhere — even when you can’t see it.
One estimate says BlueKai tracks over 1% of all web traffic — an unfathomable amount of daily data collection — and tracks some of the world’s biggest websites: Amazon, ESPN, Forbes, Glassdoor, Healthline, Levi’s, MSN.com, Rotten Tomatoes, and The New York Times. Even this very article has a BlueKai tracker because our parent company, Verizon Media, is a BlueKai partner.
But BlueKai is not alone. Nearly every website you visit contains some form of invisible tracking code that watches you as you traverse the internet.
As invasive as it is that invisible trackers are feeding your web browsing data to a gigantic database in the cloud, it’s that very same data that has kept the internet largely free for so long.
To stay free, websites use advertising to generate revenue. The more targeted the advertising, the better the revenue is supposed to be.
While the majority of web users are not naive enough to think that internet tracking does not exist, few outside marketing circles understand how much data is collected and what is done with it.
Take the Equifax data breach in 2017, which brought scathing criticism from lawmakers after it collected millions of consumers’ data without their explicit consent. Equifax, like BlueKai, relies on consumers skipping over the lengthy privacy policies that govern how websites track them.
In any case, consumers have little choice but to accept the terms. Be tracked or leave the site. That’s the trade-off with a free internet.
But there are dangers with collecting web-tracking data on millions of people.
“Whenever databases like this exist, there’s always a risk the data will end up in the wrong hands and in a position to hurt someone,” said Cyphers.
Cyphers said the data, if in the hands of someone malicious, could contribute to identity theft, phishing or stalking.
“It also makes a valuable target for law enforcement and government agencies who want to piggyback on the data gathering that Oracle already does,” he said.
Even when the data stays where it’s intended, Cyphers said these vast databases enable “manipulative advertising for things like political issues or exploitative services, and it allows marketers to tailor their messages to specific vulnerable populations,” he said.
“Everyone has different things they want to keep private, and different people they want to keep them private from,” said Cyphers. “When companies collect raw web browsing or purchase data, thousands of little details about real people’s lives get scooped up along the way.”
“Each one of those little details has the potential to put somebody at risk,” he said.
Send tips securely over Signal and WhatsApp to +1 646-755-8849.
submitted by PrivacyPostMaster to privacypostIO [link] [comments]

How To Make Money With Amazon Affiliate Marketing (2020 UPDATE) (Make Money with the Amazon Affiliate Program) (Includes a Link Sites, Login, and Account Setup) by Michael Greene | Jan 22, 2014. 3.7 out of 5 stars 41. Kindle $0.00 $ 0. 00. Free with Kindle Access your Amazon affiliate ID at any time. Visit the Amazon Affiliate website provided in the Sources section of this article and sign in with your email address and password. Look to the left side of the Amazon Associates website to obtain your affiliate ID, also indicated as your tracking ID. An Amazon Affiliate niche site by Lisa LeakeThis is a little different that other Amazon affiliate site examples I’ve listed here. First of all, this is more like a brand and an authority site than a niche site. Secondly, it is more like a blog than a review site. When a customer lands on your affiliate site (through Google or social media or however), they click on one of your affiliate links, which takes them to Amazon and tags them as your referral.. After that, you get a % of anything they buy on Amazon for the next 24 hours. Of course, this is the quick and dirty version. There are many ways to get people to your site just as there many different Hello there! Amazon Associate Store ID is a tag used to track your commissions made by your ads on the Affiliate Associate Program. You can choose anything for your Associate Store ID. For example it can be “yourwebsitename” and the resulting Affi...

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